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Coracoid process fracture

Coracoid process fracture Radiology Reference Article

Coracoid process fractures are an uncommon type of scapular fracture. They do not often occur in isolation and are often associated with acromial, clavicular, or other scapular fracture, as well as glenohumeral dislocation or acromioclavicular joint injury Coracoid process fractures: anatomy, injury patterns, multimodality imaging, and approach to management The coracoid process of the scapula is in close proximity to major neurovascular structures, including the brachial plexus and the axillary artery and vein Introduction: The coracoid process is a small hook-shaped feature on the scapula and a key structure of the superior shoulder suspensory complex (SSSC). Fractures of the coracoid are rare. Therefore, no consensus exists regarding treatment of coracoid process fractures. Systematically review indications, outcomes and complications of traumatic coracoid process fractures in adults, and to.

Coracoid Fractures Fractures of the coracoid process are uncommon, comprising approximately 13% of all scapular fractures and 5% of all shoulder fractures (19, 20). Coracoid fractures are usually seen with other fractures of the scapula or shoulder region; isolated coracoid fractures are rare (21) Coracoid process fractures are rare and often associated with dislocations of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint. There is little evidence about the treatment of these injuries in adolescents, but the few case reports published recommend surgery. We report a case of a dislocated epiphyseal fracture to A fracture of the coracoid process is a rare injury, accounting for approximately 3-13% of all scapula fractures [].Fractures of the coracoid process are typically caused by high-energy traumas and are often seen in combination with other injuries [9,10,11,12,13,14,15].Patients with a coracoid process fracture often present with pain and tenderness in the infraclavicular fossa after a trauma coracoid fractures. acromial fractures. glenoid fractures. scapular neck fractures . look for associated AC joint separation or clavicle fracture. known as floating shoulder scapular body fractures . described based on anatomic location. scapulothoracic dissociation. Coracoid Fracture Classification

Coracoid process fractures: anatomy, injury patterns

Although the coracoid process seems to play an important anatomical role, there are few reports concerning fracture nonunion of the coracoid process (CN) and its disorders. Therefore, there is no widely accepted standard for the treatment of CN Coracoid fractures are typically associated with more complex fractures of the scapula, and/or clavicle, and may also involve the suspensory ligament complex The coracoid process of the scapula is in close proximity to major neurovascular structures, including the brachial plexus and the axillary artery and vein. In addition, it serves as a major site of attachment for multiple tendons and ligaments about the shoulder. Isolated coracoid fractures are rare; however, they can be easily overlooked on routine shoulder radiographs Coracoid Process Fracture in a High School Football Player Edwin E. Ryan, Jenna Doherty, and Lindsey Eberman Abstract : We presented a unique case of a high school athlete who suffered from a coracoid process fracture following a collision with an opposing player. This fracture is commonly misdiagnosed as a clavicular fracture or AC joint sprain The patients were assessed in terms of age, gender, pathoanatomy of the coracoid fracture, fractures of other parts of the scapula, and associated injuries to the shoulder girdle. We identified 24 fractures of the base, one fracture of the beak body, eight fractures of the apex, and six comminuted fractures of the coracoid process

What is coronoid process fracture? The coronoid process is a triangular projection on the anterior surface of the third olecranon bone. It acts as a bony buttress to prevent posterior dislocation; additional stability is provided by its three soft insertions, namely the anterior joint capsule of the elbow, the brachialis muscle and the medial ulnar collateral ligament Fractures of the coracoid process are uncommon. 1 When these fractures do occur, they are most frequently associated with other shoulder injuries including: acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocations, fractures of the scapular spine or acromion, or fractures of the lateral end of the clavicle. 2 Coracoid process fractures are easily missed and the best management plan is currently under debate Coracoid processes (CPs) fracture with acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation are extremely rare. This combined injury has brought many challenges to surgeons, and the mechanism underlying the injury is still not fully understood. There is no clear consensus on its treatment

Fractures of the base of the coracoid process are relatively rare, but an increasing number of studies have reported using screws to fix coracoid process base fractures. This study was performed to simulate the surgical procedure and obtain the ideal diameter, length, insertion point and angle of the screw from a 3-D axial perspective in Chinese patients In the shoulder girdle, coracoid process fractures generally accompany dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint or glenohumeral joint, scapula corpus, clavicula, humerus fracture, or rotator cuff tear. Coracoid fractures can be missed and the treatment for coracoid process fractures is still controversial Conclusion: In the overlooked and untreated type I fracture with persistent pain and functional impairment, reduction and fixation of the coracoid fracture aimed at reconstruction of the firm scapuloclavicular connection and structural restoration of the coracoacromial arch results in gratifying outcomes

Treatment of coracoid process fractures: a systematic revie

Fractures of the coracoid process are nearly always an avulsion fracture. Two muscles that bend the elbow, including the biceps, originate from the coracoid process. If they are contracting to bend the elbow when the load is suddenly increased and the elbow is straightened rapidly, the muscles may pull off their point of attachment Abstract. Three cases demonstrating avulsion of the coracoid process from the scapula associated with acromioclavicular separation are presented. Two patients were adolescents and one a young adult, suggesting that the coracoid base epiphyseal plate in this age group may be weaker than the coracoclavicular ligaments Acromion fracture. The acromion process is the lateral projection of the scapula spine that extends anteriorly. Fractures of the scapula are uncommon injuries and account for ~3% of all shoulder fractures 1,2 while isolated acromion fractures occur rarely and account for only 9% of all scapular fractures 3 A fracture of the coracoid process is a rare injury, with McGinnis and Denton describing the prevalence of coracoid fractures between 3 and 13% of all scapula fractures. Data from two systematic reviews of scapular fractures in 2006 and 2008 reported the prevalence of apophyseal (acromion, coracoid, and scapular spine) fractures to be up to 8.2.

  1. SUMMARY: The coracoid process plays a pivotal role in the foundation of the coracoacromial arch and in cases of displaced fractures; surgical management may be warranted to avoid functional compromise or impingement
  2. Coracoid fractures are rare injuries in themselves. Even rarer are isolated fractures of the coracoid in the skeletally immature patient. Due to the low numbers of these fractures, there is no true consensus on how to treat them. We report two cases of an isolated fracture of the coracoid. Case A is a 13-year-old boy who sustained the coracoid fracture following a skiing injury; case B is a 15.
  3. CONCLUSIONS: An isolated coracoid fracture should always be suspected after receiving a direct blow on the shoulder or after sustaining a forceful traction of the upper arm. In these events, specific radiographic projections should be performed in order to visualise the entire length of the coracoid process and to avoid oversight, delayed.
  4. [Fracture of the coracoid process (author's transl)]. [Article in French] Féry A, Sommelet J. The authors have treated 10 cases of fracture of the coracoid process of the scapula. The case histories have been reviewed. The mechanism was an indirect one in most cases. Associated lesions such as fractures of the clavicle were frequent

Coracoid process of Scapula fracture is not a common entity. Because of its deep anatomic location, they hardly sustain any direct traumatic force. Most of the time, they get fractured by indirect force by the muscles and ligaments attached to them. They are usually associated with fracture of the acromion process of Scapula, acromio-clavicular dislocation and proximal humerus fracture or. Coracoid fractures are uncommon and comprise 2% to 13% of all scapular injuries. 1, 2 Typically, they occur from high-energy direct trauma such as a motor vehicle collision or fall from a height. 2, 3 Ogawa et al. 4 reviewed 67 patients with fractures of the coracoid process and classified them based on the relation between the fracture site and the coracoclavicular (CC) ligament

Base of coracoid process fracture with acromioclavicular

In the case of coracoid fractures or acromial fractures and rotator cuff surgery, one attempts to relieve tension by elevation and abduction of the extremity. This can be achieved with the aid of a so-called airplane splint or an abduction cushion as shown in this diagram. 8. Mobilization: 2-3 weeks posttraum 1. Best answers. 0. Oct 31, 2019. #1. My physician is repairing the tip of the Coracoid, he states -. The coracoid fracture tip was repaired back to the coracoid body using three #5 FiberWire sutures placed through bone tunnels in the coracoid base allowing excellent fixation and restoration of the conjoint tendon and an anatomical refix of. Traumatic etiologies include fracture of the humeral head and neck, malunion of previous coracoid or glenoid fracture, and displaced fracture of the scapular neck. 3 The patient should be carefully examined for anterior glenohumeral instability because this clinical entity can cause secondary coracoid impingement, resulting in anterior shoulder.

Coracoid Process: The Lighthouse of the Shoulder

Coracoid fractures are rare injuries, which may occur in isolation or in association with other shoulder pathology. The mechanism of trauma consists of a strong contraction of the conjoint tendon as a result of direct trauma. The diagnosis is usually difficult and many times overlooked, thereby requiring a high level of suspicion. In many cases, standard trauma series shoulder radiographs are. Approximate Synonyms. Closed fracture of coracoid process of right scapula; Right scapula coracoid process (shoulder blade) fracture; ICD-10-CM S42.131A is grouped within Diagnostic Related Group(s) (MS-DRG v 38.0):. 562 Fracture, sprain, strain and dislocation except femur, hip, pelvis and thigh with mcc; 563 Fracture, sprain, strain and dislocation except femur, hip, pelvis and thigh without mc Fracture of the coracoid process with acro- mioclavicular dislocation may present an indi- cation for open operation but only for the acromioclavicular dislocation. Fig. 1. Case 1. Schematic outline of the fracture seen in Fig. 1. We report here 4 caseswo of them isolated fractures of the coracoid process with different mechanisms of injury. Undisplaced fracture of the upper part of right scapular body is noted extending to the base of coracoid process with extensive related marrow edema. This is associated with mild edema of the adjacent soft tissues. Mild right acromioclavicular osteoarthritis is noted with subchondral marrow edema at the clavicular side of the articulation Coracoid process fractures are rare. They are often overlooked on frontal radiographs of the shoulder because they are frequently nondisplaced and difficult to visualize. The axillary radiograph is best for their detection. These fractures are usually associated with direct trauma and are associated with other fractures in the shoulder

The coracoid process is an anteriorly projecting hook-like process on the superolateral edge of the scapula that projects anterolaterally. Gross anatomy Attachments muscles: coracobrachialis from the medial apex short head of biceps brachii. Coracoid Process. Coracoid process fractures represent 2-13% of scapular fractures [37, 42, 44]. These fractures most often occur at the base with minimal displacement [37, 45, 46]. Several mechanisms account for coracoid process fractures including direct blunt trauma or indirect trauma from a shoulder dislocation [47-49] Regan W, Morrey B. Fractures of the coronoid process of the ulna. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1989 Oct. 71 (9):1348-54. . Selesnick FH, Dolitsky B, Haskell SS. Fracture of the coronoid process requiring open reduction with internal fixation. A case report. J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1984 Oct. 66(8):1304-6. . Linscheid RL, O'Driscoll SW The coracoid process is a curved osseous projection off the anterior neck. The pear-shaped glenoid fossa lies at the lateral angle, its margin covered by a fibrocartilaginous labrum, which is confluent above with the long head of the biceps tendon at the supraglenoid tubercle. This labrum enhances the depth of the glenoid by 50% We reviewed 67 consecutive patients with fractures of the coracoid process, classifying them by the relationship between the fracture site and the coracoclavicular ligament. The 53 type-I fractures were behind the attachment of this ligament, and the 11 type-II fractures were anterior to it. The relationship of three fractures was uncertain

Non-operative treatment of a fracture to the coracoid

  1. Coracoid process fractures associated with glenohumeral instability, as presented in this case, are rare and have only been described in 12 case reports. Early case reports recognized this fracture pattern of the coracoid process after dislocation and described successful treatment with closed reduction and non-operative management
  2. Coracoid process Scapula Fracture Computed tomography INTRODUCTION Isolated fractures of the coracoid process of the scapula are uncommon, and standard radiographs of the shoulder frequently fail to demonstrate the abnormality [1]. The diagnosis of coracoid fracture made by computed tomography has not been previously described
  3. Acromioclavicular dislocation associated with coracoid process fracture is a rare injury. Herein we reported two further cases with such combination of injuries and reviewed all previously published cases in current literature. In this review, we discussed the demographic characteristics, mechanism of injury, diagnosis, and treatment options extensively
  4. Educational video describing the anatomy of the coracoid.The coracoid is a hook shaped bony process that is attached to the neck of the scapula. The coracoid..
The Shoulder

Intraoperatively, coracoid process was found to have a comminuted fracture. The operative plan had to be changed on table as coracoclavicular fixation was not possible. So acromioclavicular joint fixation was done using tension band wiring and the coracoclavicular ligament was repaired using a 2-0 ethibond Pre-operative CT scan showed Hill-Sach's lesion associated with coracoid process fracture. In view of significant engaging Hill-Sach's lesion, bony reconstruction of glenoid to increase the articular arc was planned. However in view of the small coracoid fragment occurred due to fracture, Latarjet's procedure could not be planned and iliac.

Treatment of coracoid process fractures: a systematic

Scapula Fractures - Trauma - Orthobullet

  1. The middle clavicular fracture was fixed with a plate, whereas the distal clavicular fracture was fixed with tension band wiring. Internal fixation for fractures of the scapular neck and coracoid process was not performed, as they were in an acceptable position after fixation of the clavicular fractures
  2. A patient with a fractured coracoid process in association with a dislocation of the shoulder is reported. The fracture was not recognised initially, and early mobilisation was encouraged; the widely separated fracture did not heal and a painful pseudarthrosis developed. We believe that this association may not be as rare as generally supposed, and emphasise the importance of careful clinical.
  3. When the Gustilo classification type is not specified for an open fracture, the 7th character for open fracture type I or II should be assigned (B, E, H, M, Q). Specific Coding for Fracture of coracoid process. Non-specific codes like S42.13 require more digits to indicate the appropriate level of specificity
  4. Coracoid fractures are uncommon, mostly occur at the base or neck of the coracoid process (CP), and typically present with ipsilateral acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation. However, CP avulsion fractures at the coracoclavicular ligament (CCL) attachment with ACJ dislocation have not been previously reported. A 59-year-old woman receiving glucocorticoid treatment fell from bed and.

A lateral axillary view isolates the coracoid process and helps delineate associated shoulder dislocations. Tangential oblique views aid in the evaluation of small or subtle scapular body fractures. A CT scan may be a helpful adjunct in glenoid and coracoid fracture assessment. [1, 9, 10, 2, 3, 4 Avulsion fracture at the site of attachment of the coracoid process of the coracoclavicular ligament (CCL) is extremely rare. We presented three adult cases of this unusual avulsion fracture associated with other injuries. Case 1 was a 25-year-old right-handed male with a left distal clavicular fracture with an avulsion fracture of the coracoid attachment of the CCL; this case was treated. Nondisplaced fracture of coracoid process, left shoulder, sequela. 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 Billable/Specific Code POA Exempt. S42.135S is a billable/specific. Coracoid Process Fracture in a High School Football Player. We presented a unique case of a high school athlete who suffered from a coracoid process fracture following a collision with an opposing player. This fracture is commonly misdiagnosed as a clavicular fracture or AC joint sprain. Initial radiographic examination may fail to identify the.

1. Introduction. Coracoid process fracture is uncommon, with an incidence between 3 and 13% of all scapular fractures; which themselves constitute less than 1% of all fractures. 1 It may present as an isolated avulsion injury or with associated dislocation of acromio-clavicular joint and shoulder joint.2, 3 Isolated coracoid process fractures and non-unions are easily missed as they rarely. Isolated fracture of the coracoid process (CP) is uncommon. Furthermore, CP fracture associated with acromioclavicular (AC) dislocation is even rarer. One case is reported here, and relevant published articles are reviewed. Case report. A 37‐year‐old man fell from a height of 2 m, injuring his right shoulder Introduction. Coracoid fractures are rare fractures [].In the shoulder girdle, coracoid process fractures generally accompany dislocation of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint or glenohumeral joint, scapula corpus fracture, clavicular fracture, humerus proximal end fracture or rotator cuff tear [].The incidence has been estimated to be between 3% and 13% of all scapular fractures, these. Not Valid for Submission. S42.132 is a non-specific and non-billable diagnosis code code, consider using a code with a higher level of specificity for a diagnosis of displaced fracture of coracoid process, left shoulder. The code is not specific and is NOT valid for the year 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions Coracoid fractures are relatively uncommon injuries and are typically treated conservatively or with open reduction and internal fixation of displaced fractures. In rare cases, coracoid fractures coincide with glenohumeral instability. Although glenohumeral instability is frequently treated with Bankart procedures, the Latarjet procedure (or transfer of the coracoid process) is used in.

UMEM Educational Pearls - University of Maryland School of

A scapular fracture is a fracture of the scapula, the shoulder blade.The scapula is sturdy and located in a protected place, so it rarely breaks. When it does, it is an indication that the individual was subjected to a considerable amount of force and that severe chest trauma may be present. High-speed vehicle accidents are the most common cause Valid for Submission. S42.134B is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of nondisplaced fracture of coracoid process, right shoulder, initial encounter for open fracture. The code S42.134B is valid during the fiscal year 2021 from October 01, 2020 through September 30, 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions

Fractures of the Clavicle | Musculoskeletal Key

2021 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code S42

  1. Coracoid process fracture is a rare and uncommon clinical entity. Seven cases of the base of the coracoid process are presented. This fracture was isolated in one case, being in the other six cases combined with injuries, either to acromioclavicular dislocation or to fracture of the superior glenoid cavity disorder
  2. Because coracoid fractures are often nondisplaced, they can be easily missed on an AP radiograph when the coracoid is projected en face. Adding to the challenge in identification, most coracoid fractures are present in the setting of several other shoulder fractures, making satisfaction of search a com-mon pitfall
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  4. or muscles [6,7]. Forceful resisted flexion of the arm and elbow in trying to prevent him from falling probably avulsed th
  5. Coronoid Process Fractures. - Discussion: - coronoid helps to resist varus stress and posterior elbow subluxation (radial head also resists posterior subluxation); - pivotal role as an anterior buttress; - at least 50% of the coronoid must be present for the ulno-humeral joint to have normal function (i.e., for joint to be stable); - associated.
  6. To investigate the effectiveness of open reduction and internal fixation for multiple injuries of superior shoulder suspensory complex (SSSC) with coracoid process fracture. Methods Between January 2014 and October 2018, 22 patients with multiple injuries of SSSC with coracoid process fracture were treated by open reduction and internal fixation
  7. The coracoid process is a small knob of bone at the top of the scapula, or shoulder blade. It extends outward from the top of the back of the shoulder blade and pokes out underneath the clavicle, or collarbone, on the front of the shoulder. When the word process is used to describe parts of bones, it means something that sticks out

Video: Repair of an Isolated Coracoid Fracture With Suture Anchor

Base of coracoid process fracture with acromioclavicular

  1. The space between the coracoid process and glenoid is termed the 'coraco-glenoid space,'and the distance between the coracoid and the humerus is termed the coracohumeral distance (CHD) or coracohumeral interval (CHI). The morphology of the coracoid process can lead to a narrowing of these spaces and predispose the shoulder to an SCI (6)
  2. Acromioclavicular dislocation associated with coracoid process fracture is a rare injury. Herein we reported two further cases with such combination of injuries and reviewed all previously published cases in current literature. In this review, we discussed the demographic characteristics, mechanism of injury, diagnosis, and treatment options.
  3. Coracoid process fracture is easily missed in recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. We report one such case in a 48-year-old man. Radiology revealed the Bankart lesion and the Hill-Sachs lesion only; the coracoid process fracture was discovered intra-operatively. The anatomy of the shoulder was restored by fixing the fragment to its scapular.
  4. Coracoid process fractures are rare and few cases have been report-ed in the orthopedic literature. In this article, we report the case of an American football player with a coracoid process fracture in the setting of acromioclavicular sep- aration and describe incidence,.

Nonunion of the coracoid process: a systematic review

Fractures of the acromion that impinge on the subacromial space; Fracture of the coracoid process that result in acromioclavicular separation; Scapular neck fractures with an associated displaced clavicle fracture; Scapular neck fractures with >40-degree angulation or 1 cm translatio Fracture of scapula; TEST AND RESULTS: X- RAY - Fracture of coracoid process with possible diaphyses involvement. (Although radiology report states no fracture.) MRI. Coracoid fracture with involvement of growth plate. Suspicious for ant labral tear. Possible loose bodies within joint capsule. Mild signal intensity along supraspinatus

ORIF - Lag screw fixation for Body and processes, coracoi

In contrast to the above-mentioned fractures, the coracoid process fracture, first described by Desault in 1768, is a rare injury. 7 The reported incidence is between 3% and 13% for fractures around the shoulder.9, 13 Most reports of coracoid fractures are isolated cases.5, 12, 15, 1 Fractures of the coracoid process are rare. The strengthening exercises ofthe ftrearnl were encouraged. Twelve weeks mechanism ofinjury isprobably either avulsion 1.2 ordi-after Injury the patient was free ofsymptoms and able toreturn tohis. -- . . . workasacarpenter. One year later hewas working full-time withnorma Coracoid process fractures are rare, and as such our under-standing and knowledge regarding management of these frac-tures is limited. Fracture of the coracoid process appears to occur either through direct trauma, as is the case with this adolescent male patient, or as a result of excessive muscle contraction at the origin o Coracoid process fracture is easily missed in recurrent anterior shoulder dislocation. We report one such case in a 48-year-old man. Radiology revealed the Bankart lesion and the Hill-Sachs lesion only; the coracoid process fracture was discovered intra-operatively. The anatomy of the shoulder was restored by fixin

Lasda NA, Murray DG Fracture separation of the coracoid process associated with acromioclavicular dislocation: Conservative treatment, a case report and review of the literature Clin Orthop 134: 222-229, 1978 Google Scholar. Montgomery SP , Loyd RD Avulsion fracture of the coracoid epiphysis with acromioclavicular separation. Report of two. process fractures are well chronicled. Coracoid fractures most commonly occur through the base of the coracoid and are usually minimally displaced, unless there is an associated ipsilateral AC joint separation (But-ters 1996). Nonoperative management is recommended for coracoid fractures with no or minimal displacement (Carr an In type IIB fracture, the fracture lies between the conoid and trapezoid ligaments. The relationship of the distal fragment to the coracoid process may differ between types IIA and IIB. In type IIA fractures, the distal fragment remains connected to the coracoid process by the CC ligaments, which are presumed to be intact

Anatomical landmarks for the anterior deltopectoral approach are: A) Coracoid process. B) Proximal humeral shaft (on the level of the axilla) Both landmarks can easily be palpated. 3. Skin incision. Make a 12-14 cm long skin incision between the coracoid process and the proximal humeral shaft Fractures of the coracoid process of the scapula are uncommon but not rare fractures. This page considers all aspects of the radiography of coracoid process fractures. Incidence. Coracoid fractures have been described as uncommon injuries, but more recently there has been an increasing number of reports of their occurrence ICD Code S42.131 is a non-billable code. To code a diagnosis of this type, you must use specify a 7th character that describes the diagnosis 'displaced fracture of coracoid process, right shoulder' in more detail. The 7th characters that can be added, and the resulting billable codes, are as follows: 7th Digit. Billable Code

Coracoid process fractures are an uncommon type of scapular fracture. They do not often occur in isolation and are often associated with acromial, clavicular, or scapular fracture, as well as humeral head dislocation. In general, the coracoid process tends to fracture at its base and be minimally displaced Valid for Submission. S42.131A is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of displaced fracture of coracoid process, right shoulder, initial encounter for closed fracture. The code S42.131A is valid during the fiscal year 2021 from October 01, 2020 through September 30, 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions S42.136 Nondisplaced fracture of coracoid process, unspecified shoulder NON-BILLABLE; The ICD code S421 is used to code Scapular fracture . A scapular fracture is a fracture of the scapula, the shoulder blade. The scapula is sturdy and located in a protected place, so it rarely breaks. When it does, it is an indication that the individual was. Ipsilateral fractures of the proximal and distal clavicle are quite rare. Double clavicle fractures are extremely rare. We report a case of ipsilateral fractures of the proximal and distal clavicle combined with a coracoid base fracture, a combination which has not been reported before. These i, Author: Chaiwat Chuaychoosakoon Korakot Maliwankul Prapakorn Klabklay Ranaichanok Thongwichian. ICD-10-CM Code for Fracture of coracoid process S42.13 ICD-10 code S42.13 for Fracture of coracoid process is a medical classification as listed by WHO under the range - Injury, poisoning and certain other consequences of external causes

Scapula dyskinesia - YouTubeAcromioclavicular Joint Trauma - Radsource

Coracoid Process Fracture in a High School Football Playe

1. Introduction Coracoid fractures with ipsilateral acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation usually occur at the base or neck of the coracoid process (CP), with an intact coracoclavicular ligament (CCL) attached to the fracture fragment [1-4] Coracoid process fractures are relatively rare and few cases have been reported in the orthopedic literature. In this arti-cle, we report the case of an active, thirty years old, male patient with isolated, displaced fracture of the coracoid proc-ess, associated with a blunt injury to the shoulder, during a motor vehicle accident Listed below are all Medicare Accepted ICD-10 codes under S42.13 for Fracture of coracoid process. These codes can be used for all HIPAA-covered transactions. Billable - S42.131A Displaced fracture of coracoid process, right shoulder, initial encounter for closed fracture. Billable - S42.131B Displaced fracture of coracoid process, right.

Fractures of the coracoid process - pathoanatomy and

Valid for Submission. S42.132D is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of displaced fracture of coracoid process, left shoulder, subsequent encounter for fracture with routine healing. The code S42.132D is valid during the fiscal year 2021 from October 01, 2020 through September 30, 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions Valid for Submission. S42.133S is a billable diagnosis code used to specify a medical diagnosis of displaced fracture of coracoid process, unspecified shoulder, sequela. The code S42.133S is valid during the fiscal year 2021 from October 01, 2020 through September 30, 2021 for the submission of HIPAA-covered transactions concomitant coracoid process fractures were described by DiPaolo et al. 3. The second mechanism, involving a direct blow to the ACJ, best describes our patient's injury following his fall. The traumatic force pushes the acromion caudad while the coracoid process is pulled b Displaced fracture of coracoid process, right shoulder Non-Billable Code. S42.131 is a non-billable ICD-10 code for Displaced fracture of coracoid process, right shoulder. It should not be used for HIPAA-covered transactions as a more specific code is available to choose from below If, in addition, its secondary support is compromised (a coracoid process fracture, a coracoclavicular ligament disruption with or without a coracoacromial ligament injury, a clavicle fracture, an acromioclavicular joint disruption, or an acromial fracture; i.e., a double disruption of the SSSC), the fracture has the potential for severe.

Coronoid Process Fracture - Treatment and Precautions

Coracoid process fractures are relatively rare and few cases have been reported in the orthopedic literature. In this article, we report the case of an active, thirty years old, male patient with isolated, displaced fracture of the coracoid process, associated with a blunt injury to the shoulder, during a motor vehicle accident. We describe the incidence, mechanism of injury, and surgical. An example of stress fracture of the coracoid process of the scapula in a trapshooter is presented. The value of the axillary view of the shoulder is emphasized

Salter-Harris Type 1 coracoid process fracture in a rugby

to the coracoid process by the CC ligaments and to the distal fragment by the deltotrapezial fascia. Type I fractures often are only minimally displaced because of the presence of these soft-tissue attachments. Type III fractures are similar to type I fractures in that they also oc-cur distal to the CC ligaments. How-ever, type III fracture. As the name suggests a Scapula fracture is a fracture of the scapula or the shoulder blade.Normally, the scapula is pretty well protected by a web of muscles and it is very rare that the scapula sustains a fracture, but if there is a Scapula Fracture then it gives an indication that the shoulder must have been injured with a significant amount of force coupled with significant trauma to the chest ICD-9-CM 811.12 is a billable medical code that can be used to indicate a diagnosis on a reimbursement claim, however, 811.12 should only be used for claims with a date of service on or before September 30, 2015. For claims with a date of service on or after October 1, 2015, use an equivalent ICD-10-CM code (or codes)